President Trump speaks to the press from the South Lawn of the White House  prior to departing to Louisiana to hold a campaign rally.

President Trump speaks to the press from the South Lawn of the White House prior to departing to Louisiana to hold a campaign rally.

Democrats in the House of Representatives are charging forward with their impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump. Four depositions have been scheduled this week in the investigation — including one today with Fiona Hill, a former Russia advisor to the White House.

How exactly would a presidential impeachment even work? Vox explains:

There’s a lot of ambiguity around the types of behavior that can be construed as impeachable offenses.

As described by the Constitution, impeachable offenses are anything that fall under the umbrella of “treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” Because the term “high crimes and misdemeanors” is quite broad, House lawmakers have significant leeway in determining what actions they see as worthy of an impeachment inquiry.

Presidents can be impeached, basically, if House lawmakers think they’ve done something they consider to be an “impeachable offense.” Because it is a political process that apes a judicial one, there is a huge amount of subjectivity here.

We talk about the latest developments, including how the president’s decision to withdraw American troops in Syria could drive a wedge between the Trump administration and congressional Republicans.

Guests

  • Shane Harris Intelligence and national security reporter, The Washington Post; Future of War fellow, New America; author, 'At War: The Rise of the Military-Internet Complex' and 'The Watchers: The Rise of America's Surveillance State'; @shaneharris

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