The Seaboard Marine cargo ship leaves Port Miami on the day that the Bureau of Economic Analysis announced that the first-quarter gross domestic product grew by 3.2% on April 26, 2019. Part of the economic growth was driven by exports, which rose 3.7% in the first quarter.

The Seaboard Marine cargo ship leaves Port Miami on the day that the Bureau of Economic Analysis announced that the first-quarter gross domestic product grew by 3.2% on April 26, 2019. Part of the economic growth was driven by exports, which rose 3.7% in the first quarter.

President Donald Trump loves talking about the strength of the economy. He does it all the time.

And sure, the numbers do look good. The gross domestic product grew by 3.2 percent in the first quarter this year. Disposable personal income rose by 3 percent as well — overall, CNBC reports that this quarter was the best first quarter the U.S. has experienced since 2015.

And 71 percent of Americans believe the economy is “good,” according to a March 2019 poll.

Trump likely plans to campaign on the strong economy. But a Washington Post-ABC News poll demonstrates “a widespread belief that the economy mainly benefits people already in power.”

Who do those economic benefits reward most? And who should take the credit for the thriving economy?

Produced by Morgan Givens.

Guests

  • Heather Long Economics correspondent, Washington Post; former senior markets and economy writer and editor, CNNMoney; @byHeatherLong
  • Sarah Anderson Director, the Global Economy Project at the Institute for Policy Studies, co-editor for inequality.com. @Anderson_IPS
  • Brian Riedl Senior fellow and member of Economics 21, the Manhattan Institute; former chief economist to Senator Rob Portman (R-OH); @Brian_Riedl

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