Members of the public react in front of the Masjd Al Noor Mosque as they fear for their relatives on March 15 in Christchurch, New Zealand. 49 people have been confirmed dead and more than 20 are injured following attacks at two mosques in Christchurch. Four people are in custody following shootings at Al Noor mosque on Dean's Road and the Linwood Masjid in Christchurch.

Members of the public react in front of the Masjd Al Noor Mosque as they fear for their relatives on March 15 in Christchurch, New Zealand. 49 people have been confirmed dead and more than 20 are injured following attacks at two mosques in Christchurch. Four people are in custody following shootings at Al Noor mosque on Dean's Road and the Linwood Masjid in Christchurch.

Authorities in New Zealand charged a 28-year-old Australian with murder after at least 49 people were killed during Friday prayers at a mosque in Christchurch.

This story is developing. You can find the breaking updates that we’re following from NPR, The Guardian, and the BBC.

Prime Minister Jacinda Arden called the attack “well planned” and that it could “only be described as a terrorist attack.”

The Brexit legislative boondoggle also dominated the global news headlines this week.

On Thursday, news broke about the March 29th deadline for Brexit. Namely, that it wouldn’t be happening.

Members of Parliament also voted this week against the idea of leaving the European Union without a deal, and on March 12 they voted against a new withdrawal deal for the second time since January.

So what does this mean for Prime Minister Theresa May’s tenure?

Here’s some analysis from CNN:

After months of the Prime Minister refusing to open up the Brexit process to MPs, and forcing them to either back her deal or face a no deal, suddenly Brexit is wide open and everything is in a state of flux.

Ordinary lawmakers have seized control of Brexit from May.

BuzzFeed News described the conditions in London this week as a “national political situation best described as a rollercoaster of burning garbage that takes in purgatory and all nine circles of Dante’s Inferno on its way to its final destination of [s—t] creek, where they are fresh out of paddles.”

In Northern Ireland, one former British solider will be prosecuted in connection to the killing of unarmed civilians on Bloody Sunday. The massacre “became one of the main flash points in the Troubles, the 30-year struggle over the status of Northern Ireland that claimed at least 3,500 lives,” according to The New York Times. An official said the decision to only prosecute one soldier was due to a lack of admissible evidence.

Families affected by the massacre on Bloody Sunday said they were disappointed by the decision.

John Kelly’s brother Michael was killed that day. He spoke at a news conference after the charges were filed, and The Guardian reported what he said.

“I was going to say good morning, but I don’t think it is. There’s a terrible disappointment at the outcome … We have travelled a long journey since our brothers were brutally slaughtered on our streets … The full cost of Bloody Sunday cannot be measured just in those who died that day.” The shootings deepened and prolonged the conflict, he said.

Chinese authorities grounded the Boeing 737 Max plane, before the American Federal Aviation Administration did. This decision came after two deadly crashes in Ethiopia and Indonesia.

And students in 40 countries planned to protest government inaction on climate change this week. Reuters reported that this Friday’s demonstrations are expected to be the largest yet.

We’re wrapping up the week in global news.

Text by Gabrielle Healy.

Guests

  • Uri Friedman Staff writer, The Atlantic, covering global affairs; @UriLF
  • Emily Tamkin Freelance foreign affairs reporter; @emilyctamkin
  • Paul Danahar Washington bureau chief of the BBC; author of "The New Middle East: The World After the Arab Spring"; @pdanahar

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