Guest Host: Todd Zwillich

Algerian police disperse a protest by lawyers and journalists against their ailing president's bid for a fifth term in power, in Algiers. - One thousand Algerian lawyers staged a demonstration today in front of the Constitutional Council against President Abdelaziz Bouteflika's re-election bid, saying his ill health should disqualify him from the race.

Algerian police disperse a protest by lawyers and journalists against their ailing president's bid for a fifth term in power, in Algiers. - One thousand Algerian lawyers staged a demonstration today in front of the Constitutional Council against President Abdelaziz Bouteflika's re-election bid, saying his ill health should disqualify him from the race.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has become embroiled in a sticky political scandal.

Here’s how it’s going down, from NPR:

At issue are allegations made by Canada’s former attorney general, Jody Wilson-Raybould, who says Trudeau and his inner circle intervened inappropriately in the criminal prosecution of a powerful engineering firm, SNC Lavalin, headquartered in Trudeau’s home city of Montréal in Quebec province. The firm is accused of an international bribery and fraud scheme worth tens of millions of dollars.

NPR also reports that the scandal represents “a perilous moment for Trudeau, in part because many of those leveling accusations against him are friends, former allies and members of his own Cabinet.”

Trudeau has denied the charges of unethical behavior. He is up for reelection in October.

What will his political future hold?

This week, intelligence analysts revealed that North Korea has started to rebuild the structures it uses to launch satellites and test other technology for its intercontinental ballistic missile program.

This move comes only a week after a Hanoi summit between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un abruptly ended without a nuclear deal, although Trump did say that Kim promised to end missile and nuclear testing.

How might this affect future talks between the United States and North Korea?

And protesters have taken to the streets in Algeria after the current president decided to run for a fifth term.

Why are Algerians protesting the regime of Abdelaziz Bouteflika? Time gives two reasons: falling oil revenues and high youth unemployment.

Here’s more:

In Algeria, they’ve fueled a combustible political situation. The fact that Algeria is also a major oil producer also means that sustained political unrest in the country has the potential to affect global oil markets as well. And its geographic location in North Africa means that a politically stable Algeria has been an important player in stabilizing migration flows from Africa into Europe. If the situation spirals out of control there, there are no guarantees as to what will happen.

Bouteflika emerged from the 2011 Arab Spring with his government intact. Will the same happen again?

And Chinese tech company Huawei sued the United States this week after the American government banned its agencies from purchasing Huawei products. U.S. intellegence agencies have alleged the company presents a threat to national security.

The lawsuit follows the arrest of a top Huawei executive in Canada, Meng Wanzhou. The U.S. has called for Wanzhou’s extradition, suggesting that the company has violated sanctions on Iran.

We’re rounding up the top global stories of the week.

Guests

  • Mark Landler White House correspondent, The New York Times; author of "Alter Egos: Hillary Clinton, Barack Obama, and the Twilight Struggle Over American Power"; @MarkLandler
  • Karen DeYoung Associate editor and senior national security correspondent, The Washington Post
  • Imtiaz Tyab Host, "The Take" from Al-Jazeera

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