Guest Host: Todd Zwillich

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen testifies before the House Homeland Security Committee on border security on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, March 6, 2019.

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen testifies before the House Homeland Security Committee on border security on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, March 6, 2019.

A flurry of activity in Congress dominated this week’s headlines.

On Monday, the House Judiciary Committee announced a sweeping investigation into President Trump and his associates, requesting documents from 81 “agencies, entities, and individuals.”

In a statement, House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-NY, explained the committee’s impetus for opening a new investigation:

Over the last several years, President Trump has evaded accountability for his near-daily attacks on our basic legal, ethical, and constitutional rules and norms. Investigating these threats to the rule of law is an obligation of Congress and a core function of the House Judiciary Committee. We have seen the damage done to our democratic institutions in the two years that the Congress refused to conduct responsible oversight. Congress must provide a check on abuses of power. Equally, we must protect and respect the work of Special Counsel Mueller, but we cannot rely on others to do the investigative work for us. Our work is even more urgent after senior Justice Department officials have suggested that they may conceal the work of the Special Counsel’s investigation from the public.

The president maintains his innocence:

On Wednesday, Michael Cohen testified again before the House committee, releasing documents about a false statement he delivered to Congress in 2017 at the request of President Trump’s lawyers.

Where will these investigations lead?

Meanwhile, the House has delayed voting on an anti-Semitism resolution that was drafted in the wake of recent comments by Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-MN. The resolution, which “acknowledges the dangerous consequences of perpetuating anti-Semitic stereotypes” without naming Rep. Omar, will be updated ahead of the vote to include anti-Muslim bias and other forms of bigotry.

And Sen. Martha McSally, R-AZ, told the Senate Armed Services subcommittee that she was raped by a superior officer while in the Air Force. “I want to shine a flashlight for them — that today can be a new day,” she said about sexual assault survivors in the military. “They can find their own purpose and not be held back and not be stopped from fulfilling all of their potential in life because of the awful things that they were victimized from.”

Text by Kathryn Fink.

Guests

  • Devlin Barrett National security and law enforcement reporter, The Washington Post; @devlinbarrett
  • Jessica Taylor Political reporter, NPR; senior political reporter, The Cook Political Report; @jessicataylor
  • Shawn Donnan Senior writer, Bloomberg; @sdonnan

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