People attend the Department of Justice's commemoration of the 20th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act on July 23, 2010 in Washington, DC.

People attend the Department of Justice's commemoration of the 20th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act on July 23, 2010 in Washington, DC.

The Americans with Disabilities Act passed with one of the largest majorities ever.. George H.W. Bush signed it in 1990.

It’s one of his most enduring legacies.

The legislation prohibits discrimination against people with disabilities in public life; from employment to transportation to telecommunications.

Patrisha Wright, a disability rights advocate, wrote about H.W. Bush’s contribution in The Washington Post:

Without his leadership, the ADA — the most expansive piece of civil rights legislation since the 1964 Civil Rights Act — would never have been a reality. What a novel idea: that Republicans and Democrats would work together to end second-class citizenship for people with disabilities. Or that people with disabilities should have control over their own lives — to work, to eat at a new restaurant or to go to the movies. In other words, that the law should guarantee a level of basic fairness. Americans today take this for granted.

President Bush, who died last week, will be remembered for many things. The ADA is high on that list.

Guests

  • Jonathan Young Author, "The Making of the Americans with Disabilities Act." Executive Vice President and COO of Akero Therapeutics. Appointed by President Barack Obama to serve as the Chairman of the National Council on Disability.
  • Mia Ives-Rublee U.S. wheelchair athlete and disability and civil rights activist. Founder and coordinator for the Women’s March on Washington Disability Caucus.

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows