Carl Dillmam, who has worked at the General Motors plant for 37 years sits with union members in Oshawa, Ontario, on November 26, 2018.  In a massive restructuring, US auto giant General Motors announced Monday it will cut 15 percent of its workforce to save $6 billion and adapt to "changing market conditions."

Carl Dillmam, who has worked at the General Motors plant for 37 years sits with union members in Oshawa, Ontario, on November 26, 2018. In a massive restructuring, US auto giant General Motors announced Monday it will cut 15 percent of its workforce to save $6 billion and adapt to "changing market conditions."

On Monday, General Motors said it planned to lay off thousands of workers in the United States and Canada.

Plants in Ohio, Michigan and Ontario will be affected by the changes, which could impact about 14,000 workers.

President Trump said he told General Motors CEO Mary Barra to stop making cars in China and to open a new facility in Ohio to replace the one the company plans to close, The Wall Street Journal reported.

“They better damn well open a new plant there very quickly,” Mr. Trump said in an interview with The Wall Street Journal on Monday. He said he had talked Sunday night with Ms. Barra, who discussed the company’s production cutbacks.

“I love Ohio,” Mr. Trump said. ‘I told them, ‘you’re playing around with the wrong person.’”

GM’s announcement comes on the heels of the release of the Trump administration’s climate change report. In total, 13 federal agencies said that if drastic action isn’t taken soon, climate change could shrink the American economy by up to 10 percent. The New York Times has more:

Mr. Trump has taken aggressive steps to allow more planet-warming pollution from vehicle tailpipes and power plant smokestacks, and has vowed to pull the United States out of the Paris Agreement, under which nearly every country in the world pledged to cut carbon emissions. Just this week, he mocked the science of climate change because of a cold snap in the Northeast, tweeting, “Whatever happened to Global Warming?”

But in direct language, the 1,656-page assessment lays out the devastating effects of a changing climate on the economy, health and environment, including record wildfires in California, crop failures in the Midwest and crumbling infrastructure in the South. Going forward, American exports and supply chains could be disrupted, agricultural yields could fall to 1980s levels by midcentury and fire season could spread to the Southeast, the report finds.

The president also said on Monday that he doesn’t believe the report’s findings.

What compelled the president to get involved in this private-sector decision? How can we adjust for climate change, without compromising thousands of workers? And what should we make of the president’s denial of this report?

Produced by Lindsay Foster Thomas.

Guests

  • Steven Rattner Chairman and CEO of Willett Advisors, LLC; former counselor to the Secretary of the Treasury under the Obama administration
  • M.L. Schultze Freelance public radio reporter based in northeast Ohio
  • Andrew Mayeda Economy reporter, Bloomberg; @amayeda
  • Thomas Crumm Third generation auto worker; author, "What Is Good For General Motors?: Solving America's Industrial Conundrum"; former member of General Motors' management team
  • Rep. Tim Ryan Democratic congressman from Ohio's 13th District; @RepTimRyan

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