In a heated tête-à-tête, President Trump rebukes CNN’s Jim Acosta. Conflict over control of the microphone later led to the Trump administration limiting Acosta’s White House access.

In a heated tête-à-tête, President Trump rebukes CNN’s Jim Acosta. Conflict over control of the microphone later led to the Trump administration limiting Acosta’s White House access.

We’re going to be hearing a lot about Matthew Whitaker.

Whitaker is now Acting Attorney General, filling in for Jeff Sessions, who was forced out Wednesday. And it’s likely Whitaker’s appointment will change how the White House handles the Russia investigation.

As NPR reports, “Whitaker has not been a fan” of the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, led by Robert Mueller:

“Mueller has come up to a red line in the Russia 2016 election-meddling investigation that he is dangerously close to crossing,” Whitaker wrote in an op-ed last year before he came to work for the government.

He called for Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller and who has been supervising his work, to curb the investigation.

Now Whitaker is in charge of the Justice Department and Rosenstein reports to him, putting Whitaker in a position to constrain the special counsel if he wishes or if he’s directed to do so by the president.

Read Matthew Whitaker’s op-ed, in which he suggests that Mueller’s investigation of President Trump is going too far by looking into Trump’s finances related to the Trump organization

Sessions’ firing came a day after Democrats retook the House of Representatives in midterm elections. And the president is clearly not a fan of the prospects that he will face more thorough investigations from that chamber.

That much was clear in a doozy of a press conference the president gave Wednesday.

Apart from a million gifs and tweets, the press conference resulted in CNN’s Jim Acosta having his White House access limited.

In other news news, Fox News host Sean Hannity faced criticism, including some from his colleagues for speaking at a rally with President Trump on the eve of the midterm elections.

And new information came to light this week that Motel 6 “gave guest lists to Immigration and Customs enforcement ages,” as NPR reports.

Motel 6 has acknowledged that guest lists were given to authorities but denied that senior management was aware of the practice. As of last fall, the company said it had called for all locations to stop sharing guest lists with ICE.

News of the practice first broke last September when the Phoenix New Times investigated two corporate-owned Motel 6 locations in Phoenix. One anonymous hotel clerk told the alt-weekly, “We send a report every morning to ICE — all the names of everybody that comes in … we do the audit and we push a button and it sends it to ICE.”

The chain is paying out millions in a settlement.

We’ll get to this and the week’s other top stories in the News Roundup.

Guests

  • Eliana Johnson White House reporter, Politico; @elianayjohnson
  • Sheryl Gay Stolberg Washington correspondent, The New York Times; @sherylnyt
  • Asawin Suebsaeng White House reporter, The Daily Beast; @swin24

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