Britain's Prime Minster Theresa May sits with her ministerial red box, as she prepares her keynote speech in her hotel room, in Birmingham, England on the eve of her speech to delegates at the annual Conservative Party Conference tomorrow. EU workers coming to settle in Britain after Brexit will require visas and the preference will be for high-skilled immigrants, Prime Minister Theresa May said on Tuesday.

Britain's Prime Minster Theresa May sits with her ministerial red box, as she prepares her keynote speech in her hotel room, in Birmingham, England on the eve of her speech to delegates at the annual Conservative Party Conference tomorrow. EU workers coming to settle in Britain after Brexit will require visas and the preference will be for high-skilled immigrants, Prime Minister Theresa May said on Tuesday.

Don’t lie. You watched that video of British Prime Minister Theresa May dancing, right?

Let’s say you didn’t. Here it is.

She was dancing before the Conservative Party Conference amid intense negotiations about Brexit. May seemed optimistic about a deal, according to NPR.. “If we stick together and hold our nerve, I know we can get a deal that delivers for Britain,” she said, although she noted that the negotiations were “challenging” for the EU.

What’s the status on Brexit negotiations?

Other international news caught our eye this week:

The U.S. canceled a 1955 treaty that normalized relations with Iran. The New York Times described the move as “largely symbolic.”

More from The Times:

In legal terms, the United States withdrawal from the 1955 treaty with Iran does not take effect immediately. The treaty remains in place for one year from any announcement of withdrawal, meaning Iran’s lawsuit will proceed.

It was negotiated after the C.I.A. helped stage a coup in Iran that Iranians still cite as a gross violation of the country’s sovereignty. The 1953 coup, code-named Operation Ajax, was engineered by Kermit Roosevelt Jr., a grandson of President Theodore Roosevelt, and installed a government that two years later cemented the treaty with President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

The treaty sets up commercial relationships, tax structures and access to each nation’s courts. None of that has applied since the 1979 Islamic revolution.

Indonesia is still reeling after an enormous tsunami. Recent estimates put the death toll at more than 1,400 people, with nearly 100,000 homes destroyed in addition to the death toll.

Earlier this week we spoke to Louise Comfort, former director of The Center for Disaster Management at the University of Pittsburgh, about the tsunami. Listen here.

It’s also Nobel season. The prize for chemistry went to Frances H. Arnold. Arnold is only the fifth woman to win the chemistry award. Her work involves “conducting the directed evolution of enzymes, proteins that catalyze chemical reactions.” Physicist Donna Strickland also won the prize in her field. Strickland’s work laid the foundation to create “the most powerful lasers ever created by humans,” according to The Washington Post.

We’ll catch you up on the global news you need to start the weekend.

Text by Gabrielle Healy.

Guests

  • David Sanger National security correspondent, The New York Times; author, "The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage and Fear in the Cyber Age"; @SangerNYT
  • Vivian Salama White House reporter, The Wall Street Journal; @vmsalama
  • Greg Myre National security correspondent, NPR; co-author of "This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Transformed Israeli-Palestinian Conflict"; @gregmyre1

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