NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 03:  Women attend a rally and vigil in front of a Brooklyn courthouse calling to stop the nomination of Republican Supreme court candidate Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 03: Women attend a rally and vigil in front of a Brooklyn courthouse calling to stop the nomination of Republican Supreme court candidate Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Early Thursday morning, the White House announced that the FBI has completed its investigation into Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh:

The White House has received the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s supplemental background investigation into Judge Kavanaugh, and it is being transmitted to the Senate. With Leader McConnell’s cloture filing, Senators have been given ample time to review this seventh background investigation. This is the last addition to the most comprehensive review of a Supreme Court nominee in history, which includes extensive hearings, multiple committee interviews, over 1,200 questions for the record and over a half million pages of documents. With this additional information, the White House is fully confident the Senate will vote to confirm Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

The New York Times has reported additional details. According to “an official briefed on the F.B.I. review,” the bureau interviewed nine people of the 10 it contacted. And based on the findings, the White House believes the sexual misconduct allegations against Kavanaugh are uncorroborated.

The Senate Judiciary Committee is set to take a preliminary vote on Kavanaugh’s confirmation Friday, and a possible final vote on Saturday.

We’re also following the latest on immigration. On Wednesday, federal judge Edward Chen voted to suspend the Trump administration’s plan to end Temporary Protect Status (TPS), which has allowed 300,000 immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti, Nicaragua, and Sudan to live and work in the U.S. for decades.

Judge Chen wrote of the case:

Absent injunctive relief, TPS beneficiaries and their children indisputably will suffer irreparable harm and great hardship. Many have U.S.-born children; those may be faced with the Hobson’s choice of bringing their children with them (and tearing them away from the only country and community they have known) or splitting their families apart.

The ruling is preliminary at this stage. Where will the case go from here?

We’ll also discuss the sweeping opioids bill that’s headed to the White House after passing in the Senate almost unanimously.

Text by Kathryn Fink.

Guests

  • Steven Clemons Washington editor at large, The Atlantic @SCClemons
  • Eugene Scott Political reporter, The Washington Post; @Eugene_Scott
  • Susan Glasser Staff writer, The New Yorker; global affairs analyst, CNN; @sbg1

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