Committee Chairman U.S. Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) speaks as ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA)  listens during a markup hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

Committee Chairman U.S. Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) speaks as ranking member Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) listens during a markup hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC.

One of the most prominent public hearings of the #MeToo era will likely happen in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee on Monday when the committee will hear the testimony of Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Christine Blasey Ford recently told The Washington Post that when she was 15 and they were both in high school, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh tried to sexually assault her. She said he covered her mouth with his hand to muffle her screams. At this point, it’s not clear if she’ll appear to testify when he does, in front of Congress.

Kavanaugh has categorically denied the allegations, and the president is sticking by him. But his testimony on Monday isn’t a trial, even though Ford and Kavanaugh both have lawyers.

Due to the #MeToo movement, and the firings of figures like media mogul Harvey Weinstein, do women who come forward have more credibility? Could this hearing have a different result than when Anita Hill testified during Clarence Thomas’ confirmation hearings?

Lawyer and advocate Gloria Allred joins us to discuss.

Produced by Amanda Williams. Text by Gabrielle Healy.

Guests

  • Gloria Allred Founding partner, Allred, Maroko & Goldberg law firm; author, "Fight Back and Win"; @GloriaAllred

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