Sun shines on The U.S. Supreme Court building on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump is set to announce his next Supreme Court nomination this evening.

Sun shines on The U.S. Supreme Court building on July 9, 2018 in Washington, DC. President Donald Trump is set to announce his next Supreme Court nomination this evening.

President Trump announced his nominee for the Supreme Court – solidly conservative Appeals Court Judge Brett Kavanaugh.

Some Republicans on Capitol Hill had said they would be happy with the final nominee regardless of who it was.

“Republicans are holding four lottery tickets and all of them are winners,” Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) told Fox News Sunday. “If you’re a conservative Republican, the four people named … are all winners and every Republican should embrace these picks.”

Of all the explanations for Donald Trump’s presidential victory in 2016, his ability to fill Supreme Court vacancies was one of the least mentioned, despite being one of the most important.

One in five voters in 2016 said the Supreme Court was one reason they had cast a ballot, according to a CNN exit poll. And of the voters who said it was the “most important factor” in their decision, 56 percent voted for Trump. Despite more examined issues, such as the economy, national security, and immigration, The Washington Post found that 26 percent of Republicans voted for Trump to gain control of the Supreme Court.

Now, with two nominations under his belt — and possibly more to come if Trump wins a second term — the investment is paying off.

So what should we expect from this post-Kennedy Supreme Court? We’ll take a look at what might happen to Roe v. Wade, the landmark abortion case which President Trump campaigned on overturning.

[Produced by Denise Couture.] [Writeup by James Fox.]

Guests

  • Garrett Epps Professor of law, University of Baltimore; contributing writer and Supreme Court correspondent, TheAtlantic.com; author of “To An Unknown God: Religious Freedom on Trial" and "American Justice 2014: Nine Clashing Visions on the Supreme Court"
  • Elizabeth Wydra President, Constitutional Accountability Center, a public interest law firm and think tank based in Washington D.C. @ElizabethWydra
  • Brian Fitzpatrick Professor, Vanderbilt Law School; former clerk to Justice Antonin Scalia (2001-2002)

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