Placards posted above water fountains warn against drinking the water at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Michigan, May 4, 2016.

Placards posted above water fountains warn against drinking the water at Flint Northwestern High School in Flint, Michigan, May 4, 2016.

When you turn on the tap, what do you get?

The water crisis in Flint, Michigan, brought fresh focus to an old public health problem. More than 100,000 people may have been exposed to high levels of lead through the city’s drinking water. But Flint is not even the nation’s worst spot for water contamination.

A 2017 study by the Natural Resources Defense Council found that there’s a one-in-four chance your tap water is either not safe for drinking or improperly monitored.

Four years after Flint’s lead crisis came to light, what’s being done to ensure our taps aren’t toxic?

Guests

  • Yanna Lambrinidou Adjunct faculty, Department of Science, Technology, and Society at Virginia Tech; founding member, national Campaign for Lead Free Water; @DrishtiEthics
  • Robert Miranda Founder, Freshwater For Life Action Coalition (FLAC)
  • Laura Sullivan Professor, mechanical engineering at Kettering University in Flint, Michigan; @drlaura2

Related Links

Topics + Tags

Most Recent Shows