Has the fight against sexual harassment at work overlooked women whose sexuality is part of their work?

Has the fight against sexual harassment at work overlooked women whose sexuality is part of their work?

The MeToo movement has upended a status quo that tolerated sexual harassment at work.

Well, at some workplaces.

Exotic dancers, adult film actors and escorts still fear retribution and ridicule for speaking out. This month, two porn actors spoke up with allegations of “misleading booking practices, excessive face-slapping and choking, and boundary violations.” In an interview with Cosmopolitan, rapper and former stripper Cardi B cast doubt on whether MeToo would be relevant for all women:

Sadly, she says, women with her background won’t start catching better breaks anytime soon. While she’s glad to see the public outcry over sexual harassment in Hollywood, she doubts the #MeToo movement will change much in the hip-hop world, especially for women whose sexuality is at the forefront of their commercial appeal. “A lot of video vixens have spoke about this and nobody gives a f**k,” she says. “When I was trying to be a vixen, people were like, ‘You want to be on the cover of this magazine?’ Then they pull their d***s out. I bet if one of these women stands up and talks about it, people are going to say, ‘So what? You’re a ho. It don’t matter.’” As for the guys who have publicly embraced #MeToo, Cardi has her doubts. “These producers and directors,” she says, “they’re not woke, they’re scared.”

Are women in work that relies on sexuality on the margins of MeToo?

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