US President Donald Trump speaks with reporters outside the White House prior to his departure aboard Marine One on October 7, 2017. 
During the exchange, President Trump called NBC News, "Fake News" after the news agency reported tension between Trump and US Secretary of State Rex Rex Tillerson. The President will travel to Greensboro, North Carolina this evening to participate in a roundtable discussion with Republican National Committee members.

US President Donald Trump speaks with reporters outside the White House prior to his departure aboard Marine One on October 7, 2017. During the exchange, President Trump called NBC News, "Fake News" after the news agency reported tension between Trump and US Secretary of State Rex Rex Tillerson. The President will travel to Greensboro, North Carolina this evening to participate in a roundtable discussion with Republican National Committee members.

From dubbing media outlets “fake news” to sharing memes of network logos being physically harmed, President Donald Trump’s attacks on the press have been … aggressive.

None of his efforts have been successful at quieting journalists in the U.S., who are protected from the president by the First Amendment, but denouncing news outlets has influenced some repressive regimes around the world to follow suit, jailing and threatening journalists.

As the president continues to question the integrity of the press, how much damage is that causing here and abroad? And, how much does President Trump’s attitude toward journalists reflect a growing lack of trust many Americans have in the press overall?

Guests

  • Indira Lakshmanan Chair in journalism ethics at the Poynter Institute; columnist for The Boston Globe; @Indira_L
  • Tom Rosenstiel Executive director, American Press Institute; co-author of “Blur: How to Know What to Believe in the Age of Information Overload” and "The Elements of Journalism: What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect"; @TomRosenstiel
  • Hugo Gurdon Editorial director, Washington Examiner; @hgurdon
  • Nicholas Casey The Andes bureau chief of The New York Times based in Medellin, Colombia; @caseysjournal

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