International campaign to abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) activists wearing masks to look like US President Donald Trump and North Korean Kim Jong-Un pose next to a Styrofoam effigy of a nuclear bomb while protesting in front of the Brandenburg Gate near the American Embassy on September 13, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. The protests, which were organized by anti-nuclear and pro-peace group ICAN, took place at both the North Korean and US embassies.

International campaign to abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) activists wearing masks to look like US President Donald Trump and North Korean Kim Jong-Un pose next to a Styrofoam effigy of a nuclear bomb while protesting in front of the Brandenburg Gate near the American Embassy on September 13, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. The protests, which were organized by anti-nuclear and pro-peace group ICAN, took place at both the North Korean and US embassies.

The president’s sole authority to use nuclear weapons is the subject of a hearing on Capitol Hill this week. Republican Senator (and Trump critic) Bob Corker of Tennessee will lead the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in a conversation about executive power and war. The Hill reports:

A debate over nuclear authority has reignited among lawmakers after President Trump warned in August that North Korea could face “fire and fury like the world has never seen” if it continues to advance its nuclear program.

The last time this issue was raised among lawmakers was in 1976. Should nuclear authority be in the hands of one — or of many?

Guests

  • David Sanger National security correspondent, The New York Times; author, "Confront and Conceal: Obama's Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power."

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