Guest Host: John Donvan

Acting United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York Joon H. Kim speaks during a press conference to announce charges of fraud and corruption in college basketball on September 26, 2017 in New York City.  
Federal criminal charges have been brought against ten people, including four college basketball coaches, as well as managers, financial advisors, and representatives of a major international sportswear company.

Acting United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York Joon H. Kim speaks during a press conference to announce charges of fraud and corruption in college basketball on September 26, 2017 in New York City. Federal criminal charges have been brought against ten people, including four college basketball coaches, as well as managers, financial advisors, and representatives of a major international sportswear company.

The National Collegiate Athletic Association is responsible for governing hundreds of thousands of students who compete in college-level sports.

But lately, the NCAA has come under fire for its handling of a massive bribery scandal that’s prompted a federal investigation into college basketball.

Some critics of the NCAA say corruption within college athletics could be curbed by paying students to play, giving them a share of the football and basketball programs that make schools millions.

Are financial incentives the future of college sports? Would a new distribution of money put student athletics on a more even playing field?

Guests

  • Len Elmore Lawyer and college basketball analyst; former NBA player
  • Andy Schwarz Antitrust economist specializing in sports and a partner at the economic consulting firm OSKR
  • Matt Bonesteel Sports writer for The Early Lead, The Washington Post's breaking news sports blog
  • Ramogi Huma Executive director, the National College Players Association; former UCLA football player

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