Harvey Weinstein speaks with reporters at a press conference on November 15, 2006 in New York City, New York.

Harvey Weinstein speaks with reporters at a press conference on November 15, 2006 in New York City, New York.

After the accusations against film industry executive Harvey Weinstein came to light, many more women and men have shared their stories of how sexual harassment and assault have impacted their lives.

Weinstein and his alleged victims weren’t the only ones who knew about his inappropriate behavior toward women, which is said to date back decades.

How would it have made a difference if those who knew had helped? And with most of the focus on women as victims, what about the role men can play in creating a safe environment at work?

We continue our conversation on workplace sexual harassment and consider how to go from being a bystander to taking a stand.

Guests

  • Glen Mazzara Creator, executive producer and showrunner of A&E’s "Damien." He's also worked as a showrunner on "The Walking Dead" and "The Shield."
  • Jaclyn Friedman Founder and former executive director of Women, Action and the Media (a non-profit pushing for gender equality in the media). Her latest book is called "Unscrewed: Women, Sex, Power, and How to Stop Letting the System Screw Us All."
  • Tony Porter Co-founder of "A Call To Men," an organization dedicated to preventing violence against women and promoting healthy relationships. He's the author of "Breaking Out of the Man Box: The Next Generation of Manhood."
  • Chai Feldblum Commissioner at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and a former American law professor at Georgetown University Law Center.
  • Michelle Kirby Chief People Officer for Texas Health Resources. The healthcare company was recently number one on Fortune's list of the "100 Best Workplaces for Women."

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