John Wider carries a welcome sign near arriving Sikh travelers at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on June 29, 2017.

John Wider carries a welcome sign near arriving Sikh travelers at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) on June 29, 2017.

Who can come to America has changed yet again.

The latest version of the Trump administration’s travel ban restricts entry for visitors from North Korea, Venezuela and Chad, breaking with the ban’s past targeting of majority-Muslim countries.

President Trump says his priority is still protecting Americans from terrorism, but this latest round of changes to the ban has caused further confusion.

The U.S. Supreme Court was set to hear oral arguments over the travel ban in October, but that’s off the table now that the restrictions have a wider reach.

Will the third version of this policy stick?

Guests

  • Krishnadev Calamur Senior editor, The Atlantic @kcalamur
  • Doris Meissner Former Commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS); senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, where she directs the Institute’s U.S. immigration policy work @MigrationPolicy
  • Wa'el Alzayat CEO of Emgage, a group that fosters Muslim American political engagement; adjunct professor, Georgetown School of Foreign Service; former senior policy adviser to UN Ambassador Samantha Power; former Syria Outreach Coordinator at the U.S. Department of State; former provincial affairs officer for Anbar, Iraq at the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad from 2007 to 2008, during the Surge @WaelAlzayat
  • Omar Jadwat Director, ACLU Immigrants' Rights Project; he has litigated lawsuits challenging the Trump administration's travel bans @OmarJadwat
  • John Banzhaf Public interest law professor, George Washington University School of Law @profbanzhaf

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