In 2015, then-President Barack Obama spoke at the White House Correspondents Dinner with his "anger translator," Luther, as portrayed by comedian Keegan-Michael Key. Luther was a recurring  character on the sketch comedy show "Key and Peele."

In 2015, then-President Barack Obama spoke at the White House Correspondents Dinner with his "anger translator," Luther, as portrayed by comedian Keegan-Michael Key. Luther was a recurring character on the sketch comedy show "Key and Peele."

Most people in the West Wing are good with words. But sometimes comedy is harder than politics.

President Donald Trump skipped his first White House Correspondents’ Dinner while in office, passing up an opportunity to give a speech that has traditionally been very lighthearted. Can we expect his speeches to make a foray into funny territory?

And with almost every late night host veering heavily into political commentary, when does the message start to overshadow the punchline?

We’ll get a look at the difficult art of writing jokes that are both political and funny, and we’ll hear from the man behind this speech:

Guests

  • David Litt Head writer and producer, Funny or Die DC; author, "Thanks, Obama"
  • Libby Casey On-air reporter and anchor, The Washington Post
  • Brad Jenkins Producer and managing director, Funny or Die DC

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