US Navy Lt. William Edmund Newsome looks at a bronze statue of Confederate president Jefferson Davis (2ndL) that stands inside of Statuary Hall at the US Capitol June 24, 2015 in Washington, DC. Some members of Congress are calling for the removal of the statue of the Confederate president from inside of the Capitol.

US Navy Lt. William Edmund Newsome looks at a bronze statue of Confederate president Jefferson Davis (2ndL) that stands inside of Statuary Hall at the US Capitol June 24, 2015 in Washington, DC. Some members of Congress are calling for the removal of the statue of the Confederate president from inside of the Capitol.

The debate over Confederate monuments and memorials often boils down to history versus hate … and it’s heating up again.

This week, a group of activists in Durham, North Carolina toppled a statue of a rebel soldier in a scene reminiscent of Baghdad in April of 2003.

It was part of a nationwide response to the violence that unfolded at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last week where many Confederate flags flew alongside swastikas and racist signs carried by white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other hate groups.

Is there a way to deal with Confederate imagery without forgetting the lessons of the past?

Guests

  • Jillian Johnson At-large member of the Durham, N.C. City Council
  • Jonathan Horn Author of a best-selling biography of Robert E. Lee, "The Man Who Would Not Be Washington"; former White House presidential speechwriter for George W. Bush
  • Derek Alderman Professor of cultural geography, University of Tennessee; president, American Association of Geographers
  • Phil Wilayto Editor, Virginia Defender, the newspaper of Defenders for Freedom, Justice and Equality, an advocacy group that supports removing confederate monuments
  • Thomas Strain, Jr. Commander-in-chief, Sons of Confederate Veterans

Where Are Confederate Monuments?

Part of the reason for the rally in Charlottesville was the potential removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Largely placed in the last century, such monuments to the South have been coming down in cities across the country in recent years. In 2016, the Southern Poverty Law Center mapped where the remaining monuments stand.

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