A Venezuelan opposition activist is backdropped by a burning barricade during a demonstration against President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, on April 24, 2017.
Protesters rallied on Monday vowing to block Venezuela's main roads to raise pressure on Maduro after three weeks of deadly unrest that have left 21 people dead. Riot police fired rubber bullets and tear gas to break up one of the first rallies in eastern Caracas early Monday while other groups were gathering elsewhere, the opposition said.

A Venezuelan opposition activist is backdropped by a burning barricade during a demonstration against President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, on April 24, 2017. Protesters rallied on Monday vowing to block Venezuela's main roads to raise pressure on Maduro after three weeks of deadly unrest that have left 21 people dead. Riot police fired rubber bullets and tear gas to break up one of the first rallies in eastern Caracas early Monday while other groups were gathering elsewhere, the opposition said.

Venezuela used to be South America’s richest country and a beacon of democracy and stability.

Now, it’s in crisis.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro is celebrating a victory following a national election on Sunday that supports the creation of a new Constituent Assembly. The assembly replaces the country’s legislative body with 545 representatives — all nominated by the Maduro administration — and has the power to rewrite Venezuela’s constitution.

Maduro’s critics are calling the election a sham. Those critics include Nikki Haley, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., who called this weekend’s election “another step toward dictatorship.”

The vote added to tensions that have manifested in months of violent street protests against the government. On the day of the election alone, at least ten people died across Venezuela. More than 100 have died since the start of the demonstrations.

As the violence draws more and more attention to this national crisis, how should the international community respond to the political divisions in Venezuela? And what’s next for the country and its people?

Guests

  • Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez A geopolitical-risk analyst based in Chicago, where he teaches Latin American business at the Kellogg School of Management
  • Stephen Gibbs Journalist covering Latin America for the Times of London and The Economist
  • John Walsh Senior Associate with the Washington Office on Latin America, specializing in the Andean region.
  • Katrina Kozarek Video reporter with Venezuelan Analysis

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