A man drives his motorbike past damaged buildings in Harasta, east of the Syrian capital Damascus, in February, 2016.

A man drives his motorbike past damaged buildings in Harasta, east of the Syrian capital Damascus, in February, 2016.

The conflict in Syria has killed more than 300,000 people and displaced 11 million others since it began nearly six years ago. But could new developments signal an impending end to the violence?

With the U.S. on the sidelines, Russia is pushing forward in its fight against ISIS and Al-Nusra. The Russians are aided in this by Iran and Turkey. And US President Donald Trump has promised to work with Russia in Syria, rather than focus on removing Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Assad’s government forces have also retaken Aleppo, Syria’s second-largest city and a former stronghold of anti-Assad rebels.

However, ISIS is still active in the area and the group is reclaiming lost land.

With a new round of peace negotiations set to take place in Geneva, we look at what the future may hold for the complicated conflict.

Also: we’ll get an update on President Trump’s recent actions on immigration and look at what they might mean for Syria, and the rest of the region.

Guests

  • Jeremy Bowen BBC's Middle East editor.
  • Doris Meissner Former Commissioner of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS); senior fellow at the Migration Policy Institute, where she directs the Institute’s U.S. immigration policy work.
  • Lina Sergie Attar Co-founder and CEO of the Karam Foundation, which provides humanitarian aid to Syrians. She is a Syrian-American architect and writer from Aleppo.
  • Joshua Landis Director of the Center for Middle East Studies and Professor at the University of Oklahoma’s College of International Studies; he writes the influential “Syria Comment” blog, a daily newsletter on Syrian politics.

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