The Cassini-Huygens spacecraft has been hanging around Saturn for 13 years, studying the planet and its moons closer than any spacecraft in history. It’s a $4 billion project and a collaboration between NASA and the European and Italian Space Agencies.

On Friday, Cassini will be intentionally crashed into Saturn.

Why? And where does space exploration go from here?

Guests

  • Nadia Drake Contributing writer, National Geographic; @nadiamdrake
  • Morgan Cable Technologist, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory; Assistant Project Science Systems Engineer for the Cassini Mission; @starsarecalling
  • Sarah Hörst Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Johns Hopkins University; scientific researcher in atmospheric chemistry on Titan; @PlanetDr
  • Michelle Thaller Deputy director for science communications, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center; astronomer; @mlthaller

Photos From Cassini

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