Rescue workers and medics tend to people who were injured when a car plowed through a crowd of anti-facist counter-demonstrators marching through the downtown shopping district in Charlottesville, Virginia. The car plowed through the crowed following the shutdown of the "Unite the Right" rally by police after white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" and counter-protesters clashed near Lee Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed.

Rescue workers and medics tend to people who were injured when a car plowed through a crowd of anti-facist counter-demonstrators marching through the downtown shopping district in Charlottesville, Virginia. The car plowed through the crowed following the shutdown of the "Unite the Right" rally by police after white nationalists, neo-Nazis and members of the "alt-right" and counter-protesters clashed near Lee Park, where a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee is slated to be removed.

What began as a rally by white supremacists in Virginia this weekend ended in terror Saturday as a car drove into a group that was protesting the rally, killing one person and injuring 19 others. At a vigil Sunday night, hundreds gathered to remember Heather Heyer the woman killed in the crash.

The tension had been high since Friday, when a group of torch-bearing white nationalists (some giving a Nazi salute) descended on the University of Virginia campus to protest the potential removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

After Saturday’s deadly violence, President Donald Trump said, “we condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides … on many sides.” The response was met with criticism, with members of the president’s own party labeling it too vague.

Beyond condemnation, what action will follow the spilled blood in Charlottesville?

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Where Are Confederate Monuments?

Part of the reason for the rally in Charlottesville was the potential removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Largely placed in the last century, such monuments to the South have been coming down in cities across the country in recent years. In 2016, the Southern Poverty Law Center mapped where the remaining monuments stand.

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