Students LaDonna Russell (R) and Josefina Pena (L) sort food collected for Archbishop Carroll High School's annual food drive program November 24, 2002 in Washington, DC. Students, faculty and parents of the school collected thousands of pounds of food for the needy in the Washington, D.C. area. The food is being delivered to 150 families and local shelters.

Students LaDonna Russell (R) and Josefina Pena (L) sort food collected for Archbishop Carroll High School's annual food drive program November 24, 2002 in Washington, DC. Students, faculty and parents of the school collected thousands of pounds of food for the needy in the Washington, D.C. area. The food is being delivered to 150 families and local shelters.

When President Donald Trump told an audience in Iowa that he didn’t want poor people in Cabinet positions, his remark was met with … applause.

An estimated 40 million Americans live in poverty and appealing to their plight was once par for the course in politics. But who in Washington is looking out for poor communities today? And are the wealthy best-suited to design policies and programs that will give people the resources they need to rise out of poverty?

Guests

  • Terrence McCoy Reporter, The Washington Post
  • Joan Maya Mazelis Assistant professor of sociology, Rutgers University - Camden; author, "Surviving Poverty: Creating Sustainable Ties Among The Poor"
  • Michele Gilman Professor of law; director of the Saul Ewing Civil Advocacy Clinic; co-director of the Center on Applied Feminism, University of Baltimore
  • Robert Doar Fellow in poverty studies, American Enterprise Institute

Social Show Notes

Topics + Tags

Comments

comments powered by Disqus
Most Recent Shows

Manafort In The Middle

Thursday, Sep 21 2017Paul Manafort is a name you're sure to hear more often as the investigation into Russia's interference with the 2016 election continues.