Baton Rouge councilman Lamon Cole, right, appeals to the protesters for calm July 8, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Baton Rouge councilman Lamon Cole, right, appeals to the protesters for calm July 8, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Unarmed 15-year-old Jordan Edwards, an African-American, was shot and killed by a police officer in a Dallas suburb Saturday. Edwards is one of 333people killed by police fire in 2017 so far. The officer involved has since been fired for violating multiple department policies.

Newly appointed Attorney General Jeff Sessions has promised to lighten up on civil rights investigations of America’s police departments. But some cities and local law enforcement departments are moving ahead with major reform steps to prevent more officer-involved shootings. That includes more transparency, de-escalation and unconscious bias training and the purchase of equipment, including body cameras.

Can needed change happen without influence at the federal level?

Guests

  • Wesley Lowery National reporter, The Washington Post
  • William Yeomans Fellow, law and government, American University's Washington College of Law; worked as an attorney and senior official in the Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division for 24 years
  • Cedric Alexander Deputy mayor of Rochester, N.Y.; former police chief of Dekalb County and City of Rochester; long-time law enforcement officer
  • LaDoris Cordell Retired judge of the Superior Court of California; former Independent Police Auditor for the city of San Jose, California

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