Protesters shout and hold up a sign that says "No Free Speech For Racists" at a Ku Klux Klan demonstration at the state house building on July 18, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina.

Protesters shout and hold up a sign that says "No Free Speech For Racists" at a Ku Klux Klan demonstration at the state house building on July 18, 2015 in Columbia, South Carolina.

The number of hate groups in the United States is increasing according to the Southern Poverty Law Center, a civil rights advocacy organization. But the SPLC’s annual listing of hate groups has come under criticism. Some of the groups on it say they don’t deserve to be on the same list as the KKK, and they argue that labeling conservative organizations as hate groups stifles public debate.

At the same time, reports of hate crimes are on the rise, and white nationalism is openly discussed in political debates.

Who should be a part of these debates, and who should be left out? The SPLC declined several invitations to join this program because one of our guests is director of an organization recently added to the hate group list.

What is a hate group, and who gets to decide?

Guests

  • Jonathan Greenblatt CEO, Anti-Defamation League
  • Brian Levin Criminal justice professor and director, Center for the Study of Hate & Extremism, California State University, San Bernardino; co-author of "The Limits of Dissent."
  • Kelly McBride Media ethicist and vice president, The Poynter Institute; author of "The New Ethics of Journalism: Principles for the 21st Century."
  • Mark Krikorian Executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies.

Listen To An NPR Story About Mark Krikorian:

The Center for Immigration Studies head for years has argued for restricting immigration to the U.S., and Trump cited his research in his 2016 campaign. Critics say his organization is a hate group.

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