Guest Host: John Donvan

As more business leaders take stances on political issues, customers are showing their support (or opposition) with their dollars.

As more business leaders take stances on political issues, customers are showing their support (or opposition) with their dollars.

When Kevin Plank, the CEO of Under Armour, said having a business-focused president might be an asset for the United States, it set off a wave of criticism from celebrities, customers and citizens who disagree with President Trump’s policies. Soon after, Plank ran a full-page ad in the Baltimore Sun walking back his statements.

With each new political development, handfuls of consumers look to the leaders of their favorite brands for statements. There are apps and public spreadsheets and hashtags that keep shoppers informed of whether a company aligns to their political beliefs.

But do votes cast with dollars really make a difference? Will not shopping at Nordstrom teach the company a lesson about not supporting the Trump family? Will deleting Uber affect the CEO’s stance on immigration? And is it wise to tie politics and profits so closely together?

Guests

  • Shannon Coulter founder of Grab Your Wallet, a movement to boycott retailers that are supportive of Donald Trump.
  • Edward Walker associate professor of sociology at UCLA.
  • Elizabeth Dwoskin Silicon Valley correspondent for the Washington Post.

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