An employee walking behind a glass wall with machine coding symbols at the headquarters of Internet security giant Kaspersky in Moscow.

An employee walking behind a glass wall with machine coding symbols at the headquarters of Internet security giant Kaspersky in Moscow.

Does Russia hacking the U.S. election count as an “act of war”? During a recent Senate hearing, the director of National Intelligence suggested it might be. What exactly is an “act of war”? Malicious software can do major damage. And tampering with our elections is an attack on our democracy. But at what point would the U.S. respond militarily to malware?

Guests

  • Sen. Mike Rounds is a U.S. senator from South Dakota (R).
  • Laura Galante is director of global intelligence, FireEye: a cyber security company; former cyber threat intelligence analyst, Department of Defense.
  • David Rothkopf is CEO and editor, FP group, which publishes Foreign Policy Magazine; author of "National Insecurity: American Leadership in an Age of Fear (2014). Host of Foreign Policy podcast, "The Editors Roundtable."
  • Cynthia Dion-Schwarz is a senior scientist at the RAND Corporation.

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